Green roofs and walls

Green roofs and walls can provide many benefits to our city. They can add value and beauty to a building, as well as improve the City’s environment and strengthen our resilience to a changing climate.  The City of Sydney is committed to supporting the installation of green roofs and walls and has developed a draft policy and implementation plan to support this aim. 

Comments on the policy and implementation plan closed on Friday 17 January 2014Thank you for sharing your stories and providing your feedback.

All submissions are now being considered.  If you’d like any more information, please contact Council’s Senior Project Officer Green....Read more

Green roofs and walls can provide many benefits to our city. They can add value and beauty to a building, as well as improve the City’s environment and strengthen our resilience to a changing climate.  The City of Sydney is committed to supporting the installation of green roofs and walls and has developed a draft policy and implementation plan to support this aim. 

Comments on the policy and implementation plan closed on Friday 17 January 2014Thank you for sharing your stories and providing your feedback.

All submissions are now being considered.  If you’d like any more information, please contact Council’s Senior Project Officer Green Roofs and Walls at lsharman@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au

Stories

Thank you for inspiring us with your favourite green roofs and walls.


 


Thank you for sharing your story. 

  • Green roof at Prince Alfred Park Pool

    Next to busy Chalmers street and Central Railway Station, Prince Alfred Park is one of the few remaining larger parks in Sydney. As part of the renovations the first pool and park design included a brick building, concrete skate area and other recreational facilities.  Feedback from the community and councillors asked for a more creative approach to the park and one that maximised the green open spaces.

    The result – a beautiful folded landscape design, including a 2,000 square metre green roofplanted out with almost 36,000 native meadowland plants. The pool café, change rooms, storage and plant and equipment rooms are all....Read more

    Next to busy Chalmers street and Central Railway Station, Prince Alfred Park is one of the few remaining larger parks in Sydney. As part of the renovations the first pool and park design included a brick building, concrete skate area and other recreational facilities.  Feedback from the community and councillors asked for a more creative approach to the park and one that maximised the green open spaces.

    The result – a beautiful folded landscape design, including a 2,000 square metre green roofplanted out with almost 36,000 native meadowland plants. The pool café, change rooms, storage and plant and equipment rooms are all housed underneath the green roof.

    Plants include Kidney weed (dichondra repens), Short hair plume grass (dichelachne micrantha), Lavender grass (eragrostis elongata), Common tussock grass (poa labillardieri), Tufted bluebells (wahlenbergia communis) and Tall bluebells (wahlenbergia stricta).

    The water is sourced from harvested and treated stormwater.  The green roof was designed by Architect Neeson Murcutt Architects and Landscape Architect Sue Barnsley Designs.

    by Engagement team 10 Dec 2013, 01:45 PM

  • Greening Elizabeth Bay

    A 1950s toilet block in Beare Park, Elizabeth Bay needed renovating and to allow the building to blend in with its surroundings, the renovation included the addition of a green roof and green walls.  The toilet block – not usually noted for being a beautiful addition to parks, now blends with the greenery behind the building and provides a beautiful vista for the many apartments that look down over the park with . The block includes 10m2 of green wall and a 40m2 green roof.

    The water is sourced from recycled stormwater.  Completed in 2008 for the City of Sydney,....Read more

    A 1950s toilet block in Beare Park, Elizabeth Bay needed renovating and to allow the building to blend in with its surroundings, the renovation included the addition of a green roof and green walls.  The toilet block – not usually noted for being a beautiful addition to parks, now blends with the greenery behind the building and provides a beautiful vista for the many apartments that look down over the park with . The block includes 10m2 of green wall and a 40m2 green roof.

    The water is sourced from recycled stormwater.  Completed in 2008 for the City of Sydney, the consultant architect was Sam Crawford Architects and consultant landscape architect Jane Irwin.

    by Engagement team 10 Dec 2013, 02:40 PM

  • Our Green Roof in North Sydney

    We have recently installed a green roof on the rear of our house in North Sydney.  The old single storey part of the house was a collection of tiny rooms and needed replacing - built from  weatherboard with no insulation and a leaking tin roof so FREEZING in winter and BOILING HOT in summer.  We pulled the whole lot down and started from the ground (actually below the ground) up.  This allowed us to put in the required foundations and structure to support the weight of an intensive (ie 350mm of soil) green roof.  The new room below the green roof (one large living/kitchen/dining room) stays....Read more

    We have recently installed a green roof on the rear of our house in North Sydney.  The old single storey part of the house was a collection of tiny rooms and needed replacing - built from  weatherboard with no insulation and a leaking tin roof so FREEZING in winter and BOILING HOT in summer.  We pulled the whole lot down and started from the ground (actually below the ground) up.  This allowed us to put in the required foundations and structure to support the weight of an intensive (ie 350mm of soil) green roof.  The new room below the green roof (one large living/kitchen/dining room) stays a constant 22-23 degrees.  We also installed double glazed windows and doors, and a black polished concrete floor that gets the sun in winter until about 1pm so warms up during the day and releases the heat in the evening, but is shaded in summer.  The roof has only recently been planted so looks like a heap of soil with a few stick in it - but should be covered with vegetation by this time next year.  We have planted mostly natives - lots of grasses and groundcovers - to provide habitat and protect the soil as well as filter the rain before it diverts to down a rain chain, into a rain garden then into the stormwater system.  The most amazing this is that since we have built the roof, after the first shower of rain, the green roof has not stopped dripping water.  Just goes to show how it slows down runoff and acts like a great big sponge.  We also have a few vegies on the roof but we are just experimenting with them at the moment.

    Building a green roof is a big commitment and a big investment, but I reckon we will get our money back with our reduced heating and cooling bills over the future years - especially with the price of electricity increasing and more extreme weather with climate change. 

    And we love it!!

    For more information and to see some pics, we have a blog that you can see here.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    by clairehanley 10 Dec 2013, 03:01 PM