Green Streets

The City's Green Streets program is fulfilling our Sustainable Sydney 2030 commitment to increase tree canopy cover in the city by 50% over the next 20 years.

We are planting trees in streets because they provide shade, calm traffic, make streets look more beautiful, reduce temperatures and act as pollution filters for air and stormwater.

Our Green Streets program will increase the city's canopy cover in our streets by:

  • establishing planter beds in the middle of wide streets;
  • planting trees and shrubs on the sides or corners of streets; and
  • creating rain gardens to filter stormwater on the side of streets.

Stay tuned to this page for news on new Green Streets projects.

The City's Green Streets program is fulfilling our Sustainable Sydney 2030 commitment to increase tree canopy cover in the city by 50% over the next 20 years.

We are planting trees in streets because they provide shade, calm traffic, make streets look more beautiful, reduce temperatures and act as pollution filters for air and stormwater.

Our Green Streets program will increase the city's canopy cover in our streets by:

  • establishing planter beds in the middle of wide streets;
  • planting trees and shrubs on the sides or corners of streets; and
  • creating rain gardens to filter stormwater on the side of streets.

Stay tuned to this page for news on new Green Streets projects.

News

  • Pelican Street, Surry Hills - Streetscape Improvements

    about 1 month ago

    The City is creating a shared zone at Waine Street, Surry Hills and proposing improvements to Pelican Street.

    We would like to hear your feedback on the additional works which include:

    • Planting five new Tulip Trees (Liriodendron tulipifera) and installing rain gardens within the existing ‘No Parking/No Stopping’ areas.
    • Providing two additional car parking spaces.
    • Footpath extensions at the Poplar Street intersection to reduce the crossing distance for pedestrians.
    To balance the parking needs of the street, existing ‘No Stopping/No Parking’ areas are being investigated for possible tree planting locations. Two additional parking spaces will also be added... Continue reading

    The City is creating a shared zone at Waine Street, Surry Hills and proposing improvements to Pelican Street.

    We would like to hear your feedback on the additional works which include:

    • Planting five new Tulip Trees (Liriodendron tulipifera) and installing rain gardens within the existing ‘No Parking/No Stopping’ areas.
    • Providing two additional car parking spaces.
    • Footpath extensions at the Poplar Street intersection to reduce the crossing distance for pedestrians.
    To balance the parking needs of the street, existing ‘No Stopping/No Parking’ areas are being investigated for possible tree planting locations. Two additional parking spaces will also be added to Pelican Street within these previous ‘No Parking’ areas.

    The City invites you to view the proposal and provide your feedback by Friday 1 July 2015.

    For more information, please contact James Lawton, Project Manager on 9265 9333, or email jlawton@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au
  • Cowper Wharf Road trial traffic changes

    6 months ago

    The City is trialling reducing the number of traffic lanes on Cowper Wharf Road from four lanes to two. This involves the installation of temporary signs and water-filled barriers. Bus Zones, Traffic Signals and right-turn lanes are the same. The trial will concluded on 5 February. The results will be accessed by an independent traffic consultant and will be reported to Council's Local Pedestrian, Cycling and Traffic Calming Committee.

    The City is trialling reducing the number of traffic lanes on Cowper Wharf Road from four lanes to two. This involves the installation of temporary signs and water-filled barriers. Bus Zones, Traffic Signals and right-turn lanes are the same. The trial will concluded on 5 February. The results will be accessed by an independent traffic consultant and will be reported to Council's Local Pedestrian, Cycling and Traffic Calming Committee.

  • Revised concept design for Cowper Wharf Road, Woolloomooloo

    9 months ago

    The City of Sydney has plans to improve pedestrian safety along Cowper Wharf Road and plant more trees and shrubs to reduce stormwater runoff and provide more shade.

    We have revised a concept design for the road following this year’s community consultation and invite your feedback.

    The proposed design includes:

    · Widening of the median strip in some areas;

    · A new pedestrian refuge island in the centre of the road;

    · A wider footpath on the south side of Cowper Wharf Road between Brougham and McElhone streets;

    · 36 new Sydney red gums (Angophora costata) and new native grasses... Continue reading

    The City of Sydney has plans to improve pedestrian safety along Cowper Wharf Road and plant more trees and shrubs to reduce stormwater runoff and provide more shade.

    We have revised a concept design for the road following this year’s community consultation and invite your feedback.

    The proposed design includes:

    · Widening of the median strip in some areas;

    · A new pedestrian refuge island in the centre of the road;

    · A wider footpath on the south side of Cowper Wharf Road between Brougham and McElhone streets;

    · 36 new Sydney red gums (Angophora costata) and new native grasses planted in the median strip.

    The wider median strip will reduce the number of traffic lanes in some places from four lanes to two, and in others from four lanes to three. Due to low recorded traffic volumes, vehicle journey times are not expected to increase as a result of the proposal. There will be no loss of parking spaces on the street.

    The new plants will not impact on sight lines for drivers. We will also remove the trees near the Wylde Street intersection in response to community feedback.

    You can view the design in the document library to the right of this page. Feedback may be submitted until Friday 13 November 2015.

    For all project queries and to make a submission, please contact James Lawton, Project Manager, Street Tree Planting on 02 9265 9333, or email jlawton@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au

  • Proposed landscaping works at Park Avenue, Glebe

    11 months ago

    The City of Sydney has plans to landscape the closed section of Park Avenue between Allen Street and Allen Lane. Before we start work, we would like your feedback on the draft design.

    The new landscaping will provide more shade and reduce stormwater run-off in the area.

    The design includes:

    · Recycled brick paving to replace the asphalt surface;

    · Ornamental trees in garden beds down the centre of the road;

    · Timber bench seating near the garden beds.

    The proposed tree species under consideration for the project are either Golden Robinia (Robinia psuedocacia ‘Frisia’) or Jacaranda(Jacaranda mimosifolia).

    The... Continue reading

    The City of Sydney has plans to landscape the closed section of Park Avenue between Allen Street and Allen Lane. Before we start work, we would like your feedback on the draft design.

    The new landscaping will provide more shade and reduce stormwater run-off in the area.

    The design includes:

    · Recycled brick paving to replace the asphalt surface;

    · Ornamental trees in garden beds down the centre of the road;

    · Timber bench seating near the garden beds.

    The proposed tree species under consideration for the project are either Golden Robinia (Robinia psuedocacia ‘Frisia’) or Jacaranda(Jacaranda mimosifolia).

    The City invites you to view the proposal at sydneyyoursay.com.au/green-streets. You can submit your feedback on the draft concept design and proposed tree species by Friday 10 October 2015.

    To make a submission, or for more information, contact James Lawton, Project Manager Tree Planting on 02 9265 9333 or email jlawton@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au

  • Adding more trees to green Erskineville Streets

    about 1 year ago

    The City of Sydney is proposing to increase the selection of trees that can be planted along footpaths in 3 streets in Erskineville. This will provide more options for trees suited to the local soils, including the trees along Rochford, Bridge and George Streets.

    The Street Tree Master Plan sets out the types of trees we can plant in Rochford, Bridge and George Streets, and we are seeking your feedback on these proposed changes.

    The trees planted in these streets are Blueberry Ash. Many are not growing well due to the clay soil, which retains water for a long time... Continue reading

    The City of Sydney is proposing to increase the selection of trees that can be planted along footpaths in 3 streets in Erskineville. This will provide more options for trees suited to the local soils, including the trees along Rochford, Bridge and George Streets.

    The Street Tree Master Plan sets out the types of trees we can plant in Rochford, Bridge and George Streets, and we are seeking your feedback on these proposed changes.

    The trees planted in these streets are Blueberry Ash. Many are not growing well due to the clay soil, which retains water for a long time after it rains.

    We propose to plant Water Gum (Tristaniopsis laurina) and/or Robinia (Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia') alongside the current trees in locations where the soil holds the most water. These two tree species are common in Erskineville and grow well in clay soils.

    We invite you to view the proposed tree species in the document library to the right and send your thoughts and comments to Kristin Gabriel, Senior Community Engagement Coordinator at kgabriel@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au or mail to 456 Kent Street, Sydney NSW 2000 by 5pm 27 July 2015.

  • Adding new trees and shade along Cowper Wharf Road

    over 1 year ago

    The City has plans to plant more trees along Cowper Wharf Road to improve the look of the area, reduce air pollution and stormwater runoff and provide more shade.

    Cowper Wharf Road is wide enough to allow garden beds down the centre of the road. The proposed works include:

    - Adding four new garden beds in the centre of the road;

    - Widening the road's median strip slightly in some areas;

    - Planting 20 Sydney red gums (Angophora costata), five cabbage palms (Livistona australis), and small shrubs and ground cover;

    - Removing some paving and relocating some flag poles to... Continue reading

    The City has plans to plant more trees along Cowper Wharf Road to improve the look of the area, reduce air pollution and stormwater runoff and provide more shade.

    Cowper Wharf Road is wide enough to allow garden beds down the centre of the road. The proposed works include:

    - Adding four new garden beds in the centre of the road;

    - Widening the road's median strip slightly in some areas;

    - Planting 20 Sydney red gums (Angophora costata), five cabbage palms (Livistona australis), and small shrubs and ground cover;

    - Removing some paving and relocating some flag poles to other parts of the median; and

    - Adding drainage and new soil.

    We invite you to view the draft concept design and have your say before 20 March 2015. Please send your submissions to Kristin Gabriel, Senior Community Engagement Coordinator at kgabriel@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au


  • Thank you for all your submissions on Glebe's Green Streets

    about 2 years ago
    Colborne_ave
    We're proposing to make the intersection of Colbourne Avenue and Lyndhurst Street in Glebe greener and safer for pedestrians and other road users.

    We plan to do this by making the road closure permanent, removing the concrete barriers, installing trees with landscaping and a raingarden. We will also add raised kerbs and pathways ramps for improved access.

    The consultation period on the design has closed. City staff are now reviewing all the submissions and will prepare a report for the Local Pedestrian Cycling and Traffic Committee Meeting on 16 July 2014.

    Members of the public are welcome to attend and address the Committee. The meeting starts at 2pm in the Town Hall Council Chamber at 483 George Street, Sydney.

    If you would like to attend the Committee meeting, please contact Claudia Calabro on 9265 9648 3 days before the meeting to register.

    The Committee report will available after 5pm on the Friday before the Committee meeting. You will find it on the City of Sydney website.
    We're proposing to make the intersection of Colbourne Avenue and Lyndhurst Street in Glebe greener and safer for pedestrians and other road users.

    We plan to do this by making the road closure permanent, removing the concrete barriers, installing trees with landscaping and a raingarden. We will also add raised kerbs and pathways ramps for improved access.

    The consultation period on the design has closed. City staff are now reviewing all the submissions and will prepare a report for the Local Pedestrian Cycling and Traffic Committee Meeting on 16 July 2014.

    Members of the public are welcome to attend and address the Committee. The meeting starts at 2pm in the Town Hall Council Chamber at 483 George Street, Sydney.

    If you would like to attend the Committee meeting, please contact Claudia Calabro on 9265 9648 3 days before the meeting to register.

    The Committee report will available after 5pm on the Friday before the Committee meeting. You will find it on the City of Sydney website.
  • Are the travel and parking lanes in Green Streets wide enough?

    about 2 years ago
    Leamington_ave-section

    All the carriageways in our Green streets comply with the preferred maximum carriageway widths set out in the Sydney Streets Code 2013.

    The ‘carriageway’ usually contains both a travel lane and parking lane. Widths may vary slightly depending on the local situation.

    This means that:

    • Parking lanes are 2.1 – 2.3m wide; and
    • Traffic or travel lanes are 2.75 – 3.2 m wide.

    This allows for larger vehicles such as full size fire engines to safely enter and exit Green Streets.

    All the carriageways in our Green streets comply with the preferred maximum carriageway widths set out in the Sydney Streets Code 2013.

    The ‘carriageway’ usually contains both a travel lane and parking lane. Widths may vary slightly depending on the local situation.

    This means that:

    • Parking lanes are 2.1 – 2.3m wide; and
    • Traffic or travel lanes are 2.75 – 3.2 m wide.

    This allows for larger vehicles such as full size fire engines to safely enter and exit Green Streets.

  • New trees and landscaping for Colbourne Avenue, Glebe

    over 2 years ago
    Colborne_ave
    We're proposing to make the intersection of Colbourne Avenue and Lyndhurst Street Glebe greener and safer for pedestrians and other road users.

    We plan to do this by making the road closure permanent, removing the concrete barriers, installing trees with landscaping and a raingarden.We will also add raised kerbs and pathways ramps for improved access.

    Parking will be redistrbuted to Lyndhurst Street and unfortunately there will be a net loss of two parking spaces.

    Please download the draft concept design. We welcome your feedback on the proposal before 6pm on Wednesday 14 May 2014.

    If you need more information, please... Continue reading
    We're proposing to make the intersection of Colbourne Avenue and Lyndhurst Street Glebe greener and safer for pedestrians and other road users.

    We plan to do this by making the road closure permanent, removing the concrete barriers, installing trees with landscaping and a raingarden.We will also add raised kerbs and pathways ramps for improved access.

    Parking will be redistrbuted to Lyndhurst Street and unfortunately there will be a net loss of two parking spaces.

    Please download the draft concept design. We welcome your feedback on the proposal before 6pm on Wednesday 14 May 2014.

    If you need more information, please contact Deborah Law, Project Manager – Street Tree Planting on 9265 9108 or email dlaw@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au.

  • Why are we planting trees and shrubs in the street?

    over 2 years ago
    Madison_street_redfern

    Street trees and shrubs provide environmental, visual and infrastructure benefits for our neighbourhoods. 

    Street trees:

    • capture water in their canopies and transfer it into the tree. This decreases the amount of water entering our storm water system
    • filter pollution from storm water runoff
    • capture pieces of solid of liquid pollution from vehicle exhaust
    • shade the road and footpath surfaces which in turn makes them last longer
    • calm traffic in high speed or dangerous streets in a way that is preferable to installing speed bumps or raised thresholds
    • create a more beautiful urban environment by breaking up the hard and straight surfaces that dominate cities and
    • allow us to keep greening our city now that we have filled nearly every available space in our footpaths with 9, 000 new trees planted since 2005. 
    We only plant trees in streets that are wide enough to accommodate planting in the road without majorly impacting parking and other road uses.

    Tree planting in roadways provides the opportunity to increase the tree canopy particularly in situations where awnings or overhead wires constrain the establishment of medium to tall trees on the footpaths.

    Street trees and shrubs provide environmental, visual and infrastructure benefits for our neighbourhoods. 

    Street trees:

    • capture water in their canopies and transfer it into the tree. This decreases the amount of water entering our storm water system
    • filter pollution from storm water runoff
    • capture pieces of solid of liquid pollution from vehicle exhaust
    • shade the road and footpath surfaces which in turn makes them last longer
    • calm traffic in high speed or dangerous streets in a way that is preferable to installing speed bumps or raised thresholds
    • create a more beautiful urban environment by breaking up the hard and straight surfaces that dominate cities and
    • allow us to keep greening our city now that we have filled nearly every available space in our footpaths with 9, 000 new trees planted since 2005. 
    We only plant trees in streets that are wide enough to accommodate planting in the road without majorly impacting parking and other road uses.

    Tree planting in roadways provides the opportunity to increase the tree canopy particularly in situations where awnings or overhead wires constrain the establishment of medium to tall trees on the footpaths.