The Drying Green

Consultation has concluded






Image: The Drying Green Artist Impression courtesy City of Sydney and McGregor Coxall

As the Green Square area grows, parks will play an increasingly important role for residents, businesses and visitors.

The Drying Green park will be established in the town centre on the corners of Zetland Avenue with Portman Street, Geddes Avenue and Paul Street.

The park has been designed as a place to relax and play. There will be plenty of seating, lawn benches and a BBQ area. It will be a great place for families to have a party or for some quiet time on your own. The park will also have space for active playing such a kicking a ball around or throwing a frisbee.

After receiving community feedback on the the draft designs (pdf) in 2014, a scoping report was prepared and discussed at Council in December 2014. Read the Council report here.

You can now view images for the Detailed Design in our photo gallery. We are also working on integrating an exciting public artwork with the design for the Drying Green.

The Review of Environmental Factors was on public exhibition until 3rd June and submissions are now being reviewed.

The park will be constructed in conjunction with the development of the neighbouring buildings. We expect construction of The Drying Green to commence mid 2017 and be completed by mid 2018.







Image: The Drying Green Artist Impression courtesy City of Sydney and McGregor Coxall

As the Green Square area grows, parks will play an increasingly important role for residents, businesses and visitors.

The Drying Green park will be established in the town centre on the corners of Zetland Avenue with Portman Street, Geddes Avenue and Paul Street.

The park has been designed as a place to relax and play. There will be plenty of seating, lawn benches and a BBQ area. It will be a great place for families to have a party or for some quiet time on your own. The park will also have space for active playing such a kicking a ball around or throwing a frisbee.

After receiving community feedback on the the draft designs (pdf) in 2014, a scoping report was prepared and discussed at Council in December 2014. Read the Council report here.

You can now view images for the Detailed Design in our photo gallery. We are also working on integrating an exciting public artwork with the design for the Drying Green.

The Review of Environmental Factors was on public exhibition until 3rd June and submissions are now being reviewed.

The park will be constructed in conjunction with the development of the neighbouring buildings. We expect construction of The Drying Green to commence mid 2017 and be completed by mid 2018.


Consultation has concluded
  • Public exhibition: Review of Environmental Factors for the Drying Green

    almost 2 years ago

    The City of Sydney invites your comments on the review of environmental factors for the future Drying Green park in Zetland. The planned park will be on City-owned land in Portman Street. View the exhibition documents in the REF Documents Library.

    The Drying Green will provide a central green space for residents, workers and visitors in the Green Square Town Centre.

    The draft review documents the engineering, environmental and planning issues influencing the park’s proposed development. It includes an environmental management plan to minimise noise, dust and traffic impacts, and to ensure the park is designed and developed in an... Continue reading

    The City of Sydney invites your comments on the review of environmental factors for the future Drying Green park in Zetland. The planned park will be on City-owned land in Portman Street. View the exhibition documents in the REF Documents Library.

    The Drying Green will provide a central green space for residents, workers and visitors in the Green Square Town Centre.

    The draft review documents the engineering, environmental and planning issues influencing the park’s proposed development. It includes an environmental management plan to minimise noise, dust and traffic impacts, and to ensure the park is designed and developed in an environmentally sustainable manner.

    Use our feedback form to send your submission. Submissions close 5pm on 3 June 2015.

    Submissions marked ‘Drying Green REF’ can also be posted to:

    Chief Executive Officer
    Attention: David White, Senior Development Planner
    City of Sydney
    GPO Box 1591,
    Sydney, NSW 2001

  • Behind the name

    over 2 years ago

    The site for the park has an interesting history. 

    The Drying Green was the name given to the area dedicated to the drying of wool, following washing. The fleeces were spread out on the ground to dry naturally, the fluffy white fleeces covering the ground.

    Wool has played an important role in the Green Square area, and wool washing was one of the major industries in the area (along with brickworks, candle and soap factories, pottery works, tanneries and breweries).

    A Mr Barker, was an early wool scoured who established the Waterloo Mills wool wash located on Big Waterloo Dam and the Little Waterloo Dam in 1848. It was later taken over by Thomas Hayes and subsequently Andrew Hinchcliffe. The mills employed about 100 people, most of whom lived with their families nearby in Waterloo. A significant local wool broker and manufacturer, Octavius Bayliffe Ebsworth had a wool wash beside Shea’s Creek.

    Between 600 and 800 fleeces could be processed in an hour. He scoured and prepared the wool for the cloth and white yarns produced in his tweed factory in the city.


    The site for the park has an interesting history. 

    The Drying Green was the name given to the area dedicated to the drying of wool, following washing. The fleeces were spread out on the ground to dry naturally, the fluffy white fleeces covering the ground.

    Wool has played an important role in the Green Square area, and wool washing was one of the major industries in the area (along with brickworks, candle and soap factories, pottery works, tanneries and breweries).

    A Mr Barker, was an early wool scoured who established the Waterloo Mills wool wash located on Big Waterloo Dam and the Little Waterloo Dam in 1848. It was later taken over by Thomas Hayes and subsequently Andrew Hinchcliffe. The mills employed about 100 people, most of whom lived with their families nearby in Waterloo. A significant local wool broker and manufacturer, Octavius Bayliffe Ebsworth had a wool wash beside Shea’s Creek.

    Between 600 and 800 fleeces could be processed in an hour. He scoured and prepared the wool for the cloth and white yarns produced in his tweed factory in the city.